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People in Film | Sam Worthington

Posted July 11, 2011 to photo album "People in Film | Sam Worthington"

From his rambling youth in Australia to his skyrocketed rise to fame after being cast in Avatar, Sam Worthington has been a man of action and emotion. In John Madden’s thriller The Debt, Worthington showcases all parts of his acting talent to play the conflicted Mossad agent David.

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Sam Worthington | Tough and Tender

Sam Worthington | Tough and Tender

John Madden’s The Debt shuttles back and forth between two different time periods. In the 1960s, three Mossad agents – David Peretz, Rachel Singer and Stephan Gold – are sent on a mission to East Berlin to capture a Nazi war criminal, and while everything doesn’t go as planned, the trio return to Israel as heroes. 30 years later, the same three agents suddenly are forced to pay for the secrets they left behind during that famous mission. The actors playing the older agents (Ciarán Hinds, Helen Mirren, and Tom Wilkinson) are mirrored by a younger, equally talented cast (Sam Worthington, Jessica Chastain, and Marton Csokas). For the character of David, a passionate but awkward patriot, the filmmakers needed an actor who could be both focused and confused. As Madden explains, “David’s idealism becomes at risk and he doesn’t know how to handle that.” Long before Avatar turned Sam Worthington into a global name, Madden had seen the young actor in a small Australian film, Somersault, and recognized that he had a special quality: “Sam has this attractive, masculine, powerful presence but he also has a vulnerability…I felt that he could capture the contrasts of David.”